Back to idiotism and a few other changes…

by Alina Mierlus

This blog has been quiet for a while now. I do hope to start writing soon (although I think I’ll do most of my next writing in Catalan – and the focus will not be only in technology).
A few people asked me what I’m doing now, since I’m not so active in projects I used to contribute (e.g. Mozilla) or doing things I used to do locally (e.g. participating in tech. events and open source groups).

Well, part of the answer is that during the last year I tried to find some time for myself. I started to feel kind of overwhelmed by the amount and quality of the information around me (yes, yes, I mean that kind of BuzzMachine that most of Open Source/Tech. “community” seems to be nowadays).

And what is it better than becoming an idiot? Experimenting that state of being useless to the world, of being less intelligent than most of the “smart citizens”, and start questioning again why and how things happen.

Professor Han, a contemporary essayist and cultural theorist from Germany, puts it very well:

It’s a function of philosophy to represent the role of the idiot. From the beginning, the philosophy goes along with the idiotism. Any philosopher that generates a new language, a new style, a new thinking, needs to be an idiot before.

The history of philosophy is a history of idiotisms.
Socrates, who only knows that he doesn’t know anything, is an idiot. An idiot is also Descartes, because he doubts of everything. Cogito ergo sum is an idiotism.
An internal contraction of thinking makes possible a new beginning. Descartes thinks about the thinking. The thinking recovers its virginal state when it connects with itself. Deluze opposes to the Cartesian idiot an another idiot [...]

Today, it looks like the somewhat marginalised, the crazy and the idiot basically disappeared from society. The whole network connectedness and the digital communications increase considerably the coercion over conformity. The violence of consensus repress the idiotisms.

(from the book “Psychopolitik: Neoliberalismus und die neuen Machttechniken”)

Yes, part of my time right now is devoted to studying philosophy at the University (offline and back to the system!). And I really like it very much. Only because you are there with a group of people who disagrees with you, who appreciates your critique, your skepticism and negativity… makes me feel much more being part of a community.

However, I’m not out of the technology world, as the other part of my time is devoted to work, which means applications development, deployments and even trainings.
But indeed, I’m feeling that I have to step back from the BuzzMachine that OpenSource/OpenWeb/OpenWathever has became. I’ve also developed more of a critical view on what is “connectedness or a connected society”, including the “sharing economy” – a deviation of open source concept (which on its turn is a mutation of Free Software social movement).